Notching the arms, from Nick

On to the arms. 1st I cut two pieces 42” long. Shells wants this swift to handle a 100” hank (so she can make me a 15 foot scarf). So the distance between the furthest pegs needs to be 34”. Then we need the arms to extend 4” from the last peg to support the yarn. 34 + 4 + 4 = 42. Right?
The 2 arms will be notched so they create a cross that will lay flat on the Susan. First step is to find the center of the arms at 21” and mark a line. I clap the arms together for this step. Makes it easer to mark both arms the same.
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Next I need to see how wide to make the notch. Break out the digital calipers (Have I mentioned this is one of my favorite tools). These sticks are 1.516” wide.
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Break out the cell phone for some quick division. Half of 1.516 is .758 (I don’t trust myself to do simple math in my head, especially when cutting something). Now I mark a line .758” to either side of the center line.
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The result is the location of the notches marked out exactly in the center of the arms.
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Next we need to figure out the depth of the notch. Which will be half the thickness of the of the material. Half of .760” is .38”…
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Now in a perfect world I would notch out these arms with a fancy router table (Think Yankee Workshop, that guy had everything!). But after looking around my basement I could not find one of those. So it’s off to the table saw to utilize a method I saw my father perfect while building many bookshelves for my mom.
The 1st step is to set the saw blade to .38” (the depth of the notch)
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Then it’s just a matter of passing the wood though the saw moving it over a slight amount each time. This will eventually change the area we want notched out into saw dust. With a little practice it’s possible to obtain very accurate results.

Here I’m making a small notch in a scrap piece to test my saw setting.
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After some fine tuning I get the results I want. If the material left over is .38” thick that means the notch is also .38” deep. .38 + .38 = .760 (the thickness of our wood). Isn’t math fun?
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Now I move to the real thing. Since the saw is set all I need to do is stay in the lines I marked out (think kindergarten).
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After a few minutes I have the notches done.
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Here are the notches in action right before they go together.
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And here they are together. Everything is sitting flat which is good!
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A quick test with a metal square shows a perfect 90 Deg junction. Success!
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Next we need to mark the center of the junction for the screw hole. Nothing fancy here, X marks the spot.
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Same routine here. Make an indention with the hand drill.
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Off to the drill press to bore a small pilot hole.
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Then drill the final size to allow for the #10 screw.
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Here are all the parts that Shells will be dealing with (minus the pegs).
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And 20 seconds later things are all together. Don’t forget the washer to protect the top of the arms! Otherwise the thumb screw would dig into the wood.

The arms sit nice and flat on the Susan. And the thumb screw provides more than enough pressure to hold everything in place.
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And a spin test shows everything is stable and balanced. I’m not sure why but as I spin this thing I think “WHEEL – OF – FORTUNE”
Next are the peg holes. A whole boat load of them!